fuckyeahdirectors:

Guillermo Del Toro
fuckyeahdirectors:

Guillermo Del Toro
I’m going to be doing a series of posts about films I loved when I was young that are unavailable on home video.
The Journey of Natty GannDisney - 1985Directed by Jeremy KaganWritten by Jeanne Rosenberg (who also wrote The Black Stallion and White Fang)
Starring Meredith Salenger, John Cusack, Ray Wise, Scatman Crothers, and last, but certainly not least, Jed the wolf-dog.
Natty Gann is my favorite live-action Disney family film. It’s a rousing, moving adventure/coming of age film, set during the Great Depression. It features a brave, plucky young Natty Gann (Salenger) who is separated from her father (Wise) in Chicago and forced to ride the rails across the poverty-stricken nation to try and find him. She is befriended along the way by a wolf, falls in with a gang of young thieves, has a tender romance with a fellow vagabond (Cusack), and is nearly killed in a train derailment. Performances, pace, tone, James Horner’s score, etc, are excellent across the board. The end still makes me feel things.
Kagan and DP Dick Bush, who shot Friedkin’s “Sorcerer” and Ken Russell’s “Tommy,” framed the film in 2.35 : 1. The cinematography is majestic. Currently the film is only available to view is an embarrassingly unwatchable full frame transfer on DVD. It actually looks like the image on the DVD was sourced from an earlier VHS image. This same transfer is what’s available to buy on iTunes/Apple TV.
I have reached out to Disney and will continue to do so to see that this wonderful film is made available on Blu-ray in its proper aspect ratio.
Anyone else out there a fan of Natty Gann? I’m going to be doing a series of posts about films I loved when I was young that are unavailable on home video.
The Journey of Natty GannDisney - 1985Directed by Jeremy KaganWritten by Jeanne Rosenberg (who also wrote The Black Stallion and White Fang)
Starring Meredith Salenger, John Cusack, Ray Wise, Scatman Crothers, and last, but certainly not least, Jed the wolf-dog.
Natty Gann is my favorite live-action Disney family film. It’s a rousing, moving adventure/coming of age film, set during the Great Depression. It features a brave, plucky young Natty Gann (Salenger) who is separated from her father (Wise) in Chicago and forced to ride the rails across the poverty-stricken nation to try and find him. She is befriended along the way by a wolf, falls in with a gang of young thieves, has a tender romance with a fellow vagabond (Cusack), and is nearly killed in a train derailment. Performances, pace, tone, James Horner’s score, etc, are excellent across the board. The end still makes me feel things.
Kagan and DP Dick Bush, who shot Friedkin’s “Sorcerer” and Ken Russell’s “Tommy,” framed the film in 2.35 : 1. The cinematography is majestic. Currently the film is only available to view is an embarrassingly unwatchable full frame transfer on DVD. It actually looks like the image on the DVD was sourced from an earlier VHS image. This same transfer is what’s available to buy on iTunes/Apple TV.
I have reached out to Disney and will continue to do so to see that this wonderful film is made available on Blu-ray in its proper aspect ratio.
Anyone else out there a fan of Natty Gann? I’m going to be doing a series of posts about films I loved when I was young that are unavailable on home video.
The Journey of Natty GannDisney - 1985Directed by Jeremy KaganWritten by Jeanne Rosenberg (who also wrote The Black Stallion and White Fang)
Starring Meredith Salenger, John Cusack, Ray Wise, Scatman Crothers, and last, but certainly not least, Jed the wolf-dog.
Natty Gann is my favorite live-action Disney family film. It’s a rousing, moving adventure/coming of age film, set during the Great Depression. It features a brave, plucky young Natty Gann (Salenger) who is separated from her father (Wise) in Chicago and forced to ride the rails across the poverty-stricken nation to try and find him. She is befriended along the way by a wolf, falls in with a gang of young thieves, has a tender romance with a fellow vagabond (Cusack), and is nearly killed in a train derailment. Performances, pace, tone, James Horner’s score, etc, are excellent across the board. The end still makes me feel things.
Kagan and DP Dick Bush, who shot Friedkin’s “Sorcerer” and Ken Russell’s “Tommy,” framed the film in 2.35 : 1. The cinematography is majestic. Currently the film is only available to view is an embarrassingly unwatchable full frame transfer on DVD. It actually looks like the image on the DVD was sourced from an earlier VHS image. This same transfer is what’s available to buy on iTunes/Apple TV.
I have reached out to Disney and will continue to do so to see that this wonderful film is made available on Blu-ray in its proper aspect ratio.
Anyone else out there a fan of Natty Gann? I’m going to be doing a series of posts about films I loved when I was young that are unavailable on home video.
The Journey of Natty GannDisney - 1985Directed by Jeremy KaganWritten by Jeanne Rosenberg (who also wrote The Black Stallion and White Fang)
Starring Meredith Salenger, John Cusack, Ray Wise, Scatman Crothers, and last, but certainly not least, Jed the wolf-dog.
Natty Gann is my favorite live-action Disney family film. It’s a rousing, moving adventure/coming of age film, set during the Great Depression. It features a brave, plucky young Natty Gann (Salenger) who is separated from her father (Wise) in Chicago and forced to ride the rails across the poverty-stricken nation to try and find him. She is befriended along the way by a wolf, falls in with a gang of young thieves, has a tender romance with a fellow vagabond (Cusack), and is nearly killed in a train derailment. Performances, pace, tone, James Horner’s score, etc, are excellent across the board. The end still makes me feel things.
Kagan and DP Dick Bush, who shot Friedkin’s “Sorcerer” and Ken Russell’s “Tommy,” framed the film in 2.35 : 1. The cinematography is majestic. Currently the film is only available to view is an embarrassingly unwatchable full frame transfer on DVD. It actually looks like the image on the DVD was sourced from an earlier VHS image. This same transfer is what’s available to buy on iTunes/Apple TV.
I have reached out to Disney and will continue to do so to see that this wonderful film is made available on Blu-ray in its proper aspect ratio.
Anyone else out there a fan of Natty Gann? I’m going to be doing a series of posts about films I loved when I was young that are unavailable on home video.
The Journey of Natty GannDisney - 1985Directed by Jeremy KaganWritten by Jeanne Rosenberg (who also wrote The Black Stallion and White Fang)
Starring Meredith Salenger, John Cusack, Ray Wise, Scatman Crothers, and last, but certainly not least, Jed the wolf-dog.
Natty Gann is my favorite live-action Disney family film. It’s a rousing, moving adventure/coming of age film, set during the Great Depression. It features a brave, plucky young Natty Gann (Salenger) who is separated from her father (Wise) in Chicago and forced to ride the rails across the poverty-stricken nation to try and find him. She is befriended along the way by a wolf, falls in with a gang of young thieves, has a tender romance with a fellow vagabond (Cusack), and is nearly killed in a train derailment. Performances, pace, tone, James Horner’s score, etc, are excellent across the board. The end still makes me feel things.
Kagan and DP Dick Bush, who shot Friedkin’s “Sorcerer” and Ken Russell’s “Tommy,” framed the film in 2.35 : 1. The cinematography is majestic. Currently the film is only available to view is an embarrassingly unwatchable full frame transfer on DVD. It actually looks like the image on the DVD was sourced from an earlier VHS image. This same transfer is what’s available to buy on iTunes/Apple TV.
I have reached out to Disney and will continue to do so to see that this wonderful film is made available on Blu-ray in its proper aspect ratio.
Anyone else out there a fan of Natty Gann? I’m going to be doing a series of posts about films I loved when I was young that are unavailable on home video.
The Journey of Natty GannDisney - 1985Directed by Jeremy KaganWritten by Jeanne Rosenberg (who also wrote The Black Stallion and White Fang)
Starring Meredith Salenger, John Cusack, Ray Wise, Scatman Crothers, and last, but certainly not least, Jed the wolf-dog.
Natty Gann is my favorite live-action Disney family film. It’s a rousing, moving adventure/coming of age film, set during the Great Depression. It features a brave, plucky young Natty Gann (Salenger) who is separated from her father (Wise) in Chicago and forced to ride the rails across the poverty-stricken nation to try and find him. She is befriended along the way by a wolf, falls in with a gang of young thieves, has a tender romance with a fellow vagabond (Cusack), and is nearly killed in a train derailment. Performances, pace, tone, James Horner’s score, etc, are excellent across the board. The end still makes me feel things.
Kagan and DP Dick Bush, who shot Friedkin’s “Sorcerer” and Ken Russell’s “Tommy,” framed the film in 2.35 : 1. The cinematography is majestic. Currently the film is only available to view is an embarrassingly unwatchable full frame transfer on DVD. It actually looks like the image on the DVD was sourced from an earlier VHS image. This same transfer is what’s available to buy on iTunes/Apple TV.
I have reached out to Disney and will continue to do so to see that this wonderful film is made available on Blu-ray in its proper aspect ratio.
Anyone else out there a fan of Natty Gann? I’m going to be doing a series of posts about films I loved when I was young that are unavailable on home video.
The Journey of Natty GannDisney - 1985Directed by Jeremy KaganWritten by Jeanne Rosenberg (who also wrote The Black Stallion and White Fang)
Starring Meredith Salenger, John Cusack, Ray Wise, Scatman Crothers, and last, but certainly not least, Jed the wolf-dog.
Natty Gann is my favorite live-action Disney family film. It’s a rousing, moving adventure/coming of age film, set during the Great Depression. It features a brave, plucky young Natty Gann (Salenger) who is separated from her father (Wise) in Chicago and forced to ride the rails across the poverty-stricken nation to try and find him. She is befriended along the way by a wolf, falls in with a gang of young thieves, has a tender romance with a fellow vagabond (Cusack), and is nearly killed in a train derailment. Performances, pace, tone, James Horner’s score, etc, are excellent across the board. The end still makes me feel things.
Kagan and DP Dick Bush, who shot Friedkin’s “Sorcerer” and Ken Russell’s “Tommy,” framed the film in 2.35 : 1. The cinematography is majestic. Currently the film is only available to view is an embarrassingly unwatchable full frame transfer on DVD. It actually looks like the image on the DVD was sourced from an earlier VHS image. This same transfer is what’s available to buy on iTunes/Apple TV.
I have reached out to Disney and will continue to do so to see that this wonderful film is made available on Blu-ray in its proper aspect ratio.
Anyone else out there a fan of Natty Gann? I’m going to be doing a series of posts about films I loved when I was young that are unavailable on home video.
The Journey of Natty GannDisney - 1985Directed by Jeremy KaganWritten by Jeanne Rosenberg (who also wrote The Black Stallion and White Fang)
Starring Meredith Salenger, John Cusack, Ray Wise, Scatman Crothers, and last, but certainly not least, Jed the wolf-dog.
Natty Gann is my favorite live-action Disney family film. It’s a rousing, moving adventure/coming of age film, set during the Great Depression. It features a brave, plucky young Natty Gann (Salenger) who is separated from her father (Wise) in Chicago and forced to ride the rails across the poverty-stricken nation to try and find him. She is befriended along the way by a wolf, falls in with a gang of young thieves, has a tender romance with a fellow vagabond (Cusack), and is nearly killed in a train derailment. Performances, pace, tone, James Horner’s score, etc, are excellent across the board. The end still makes me feel things.
Kagan and DP Dick Bush, who shot Friedkin’s “Sorcerer” and Ken Russell’s “Tommy,” framed the film in 2.35 : 1. The cinematography is majestic. Currently the film is only available to view is an embarrassingly unwatchable full frame transfer on DVD. It actually looks like the image on the DVD was sourced from an earlier VHS image. This same transfer is what’s available to buy on iTunes/Apple TV.
I have reached out to Disney and will continue to do so to see that this wonderful film is made available on Blu-ray in its proper aspect ratio.
Anyone else out there a fan of Natty Gann?

I’m going to be doing a series of posts about films I loved when I was young that are unavailable on home video.

The Journey of Natty Gann
Disney - 1985
Directed by Jeremy Kagan
Written by Jeanne Rosenberg (who also wrote The Black Stallion and White Fang)

Starring Meredith Salenger, John Cusack, Ray Wise, Scatman Crothers, and last, but certainly not least, Jed the wolf-dog.

Natty Gann is my favorite live-action Disney family film. It’s a rousing, moving adventure/coming of age film, set during the Great Depression. It features a brave, plucky young Natty Gann (Salenger) who is separated from her father (Wise) in Chicago and forced to ride the rails across the poverty-stricken nation to try and find him. She is befriended along the way by a wolf, falls in with a gang of young thieves, has a tender romance with a fellow vagabond (Cusack), and is nearly killed in a train derailment. Performances, pace, tone, James Horner’s score, etc, are excellent across the board. The end still makes me feel things.

Kagan and DP Dick Bush, who shot Friedkin’s “Sorcerer” and Ken Russell’s “Tommy,” framed the film in 2.35 : 1. The cinematography is majestic. Currently the film is only available to view is an embarrassingly unwatchable full frame transfer on DVD. It actually looks like the image on the DVD was sourced from an earlier VHS image. This same transfer is what’s available to buy on iTunes/Apple TV.

I have reached out to Disney and will continue to do so to see that this wonderful film is made available on Blu-ray in its proper aspect ratio.

Anyone else out there a fan of Natty Gann?

criterioncast:

Available today from the Criterion Collection: John Ford’s My Darling Clementine

“Affecting and stunningly photographed, My Darling Clementine is a story of the triumph of civilization over the Wild West from American cinema’s consummate mythmaker.”

Supplements include:

  • New 4K digital restoration of the theatrical release version of the film, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • High-definition presentation of the 103-minute prerelease version of the film
  • New audio commentary featuring John Ford biographer Joseph McBride
  • New interview with western historian Andrew C. Isenberg about the real Wyatt Earp
  • Comparison of the two versions by film preservationist Robert Gitt
  • New video essay by Ford scholar Tag Gallagher
  • Bandit’s Wager, a 1916 silent western short costarring Ford and directed by his brother, Francis Ford, featuring new music composed and performed by Donald Sosin
  • NBC television reports from 1963 and 1975 about the history of Tombstone and Monument Valley
  • Lux Radio Theatre adaptation from 1947 starring Henry Fonda and Cathy Downs
  • Trailer
  • PLUS: An essay by critic David Jenkins

Order on Amazon

criterioncast:

Nightbreed: The Director’s Cut (2-Disc Edition)

“For the first time on home video, you can experience Clive Barker’s original director’s cut of Nightbreed with over 40 minutes of new footage, all mastered in high definition from the original camera negative”

Bonus Features

  • New “Director’s Cut” presentation of the film which contains over 40 minutes of new and altered footage
  • Introduction by writer/director Clive Barker and restoration producer Mark Alan Miller
  • Audio Commentary by writer/director Clive Barker and restoration producer Mark Alan Miller
  • Tribes of the Moon: The Making of Nightbreed featuring interviews with Craig Sheffer, Anne Bobby, Doug Bradley and more… (72 min.)
  • Making Monsters - interviews with makeup effects artists Bob Keen, Martin Mercer and Paul Jones (42 min.)
  • Fire! Fights! Stunts! 2nd Unit Shooting - an interview with Andy Armstrong (20 min.)
  • Original Theatrical Trailer

Available October 28th

criterioncast:

La Dolce Vita

“A look at the darkness beneath the seductive lifestyles of Rome’s rich and glamorous, the film follows a notorious celebrity journalist (a sublimely cool Marcello Mastroianni) during a hectic week spent on the peripheries of the spotlight. This mordant picture was an incisive commentary on the deepening decadence of contemporary Europe, and it provided a prescient glimpse of just how gossip- and fame-obsessed our society would become.”

Available October 21st, pre-order on Amazon

criterioncast:


You can now pre-order Monte Hellman’s The Shooting and Ride In The Whirlwind through the Criterion Collection’s iTunes channel. The films will be available for download on October 21st, ahead of the DVD and Blu-ray release from Criterion on November 11th.
The Shooting

“In this eerie, existential western directed by Monte Hellman and written by Carole Eastman, Warren Oates and Will Hutchins play a bounty hunter and his sidekick who are talked by a mysterious woman (Millie Perkins) into leading her into the desert on a murkily motivated revenge mission.”

Ride In The Whirlwind

“Working from a thoughtful script by Jack Nicholson, Monte Hellman fashioned this moody and tense western about a trio of cowhands who are mistaken for robbers and must outrun and hide from a posse of bloodthirsty vigilantes in the wilds of Utah.”

criterioncast:


You can now pre-order Monte Hellman’s The Shooting and Ride In The Whirlwind through the Criterion Collection’s iTunes channel. The films will be available for download on October 21st, ahead of the DVD and Blu-ray release from Criterion on November 11th.
The Shooting

“In this eerie, existential western directed by Monte Hellman and written by Carole Eastman, Warren Oates and Will Hutchins play a bounty hunter and his sidekick who are talked by a mysterious woman (Millie Perkins) into leading her into the desert on a murkily motivated revenge mission.”

Ride In The Whirlwind

“Working from a thoughtful script by Jack Nicholson, Monte Hellman fashioned this moody and tense western about a trio of cowhands who are mistaken for robbers and must outrun and hide from a posse of bloodthirsty vigilantes in the wilds of Utah.”

criterioncast:

You can now pre-order Monte Hellman’s The Shooting and Ride In The Whirlwind through the Criterion Collection’s iTunes channel. The films will be available for download on October 21st, ahead of the DVD and Blu-ray release from Criterion on November 11th.

The Shooting

“In this eerie, existential western directed by Monte Hellman and written by Carole Eastman, Warren Oates and Will Hutchins play a bounty hunter and his sidekick who are talked by a mysterious woman (Millie Perkins) into leading her into the desert on a murkily motivated revenge mission.”

Ride In The Whirlwind

“Working from a thoughtful script by Jack Nicholson, Monte Hellman fashioned this moody and tense western about a trio of cowhands who are mistaken for robbers and must outrun and hide from a posse of bloodthirsty vigilantes in the wilds of Utah.”

criterioncast:


Available on Blu-ray today from the Criterion Collection:
Serge Bourguignon’s Sundays and Cybèle

“In this provocative Academy Award winner from French director Serge Bourguignon, a psychologically damaged war veteran and a neglected child begin a startlingly intimate friendship—one that ultimately ignites the suspicion and anger of his friends and neighbors in suburban Paris. Bourguignon’s film makes thoughtful, humane drama out of potentially incendiary subject matter, and with the help of the sensitive cinematography of Henri Decaë and a delicate score by Maurice Jarre, Sundays and Cybèle becomes a stirring contemplation of an alliance between two troubled souls.”

Order on Amazon / Barnes & Noble / Deep Discount / Best Buy
Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Ali: Fear Eats The Soul

“The wildly prolific German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder paid homage to his cinematic hero Douglas Sirk with this update of that filmmaker’s 1955 All That Heaven Allows. A lonely widow (Brigitte Mira) meets a much younger Arab worker (El Hedi ben Salem) in a bar during a rainstorm. They fall in love, to their own surprise—and to the outright shock of their families, colleagues, and drinking buddies. In Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, Fassbinder expertly wields the emotional power of classic Hollywood melodrama to expose the racial tensions underlying contemporary German culture.”

Order on Amazon / Barnes & Noble / Deep Discount / Best Buy
criterioncast:


Available on Blu-ray today from the Criterion Collection:
Serge Bourguignon’s Sundays and Cybèle

“In this provocative Academy Award winner from French director Serge Bourguignon, a psychologically damaged war veteran and a neglected child begin a startlingly intimate friendship—one that ultimately ignites the suspicion and anger of his friends and neighbors in suburban Paris. Bourguignon’s film makes thoughtful, humane drama out of potentially incendiary subject matter, and with the help of the sensitive cinematography of Henri Decaë and a delicate score by Maurice Jarre, Sundays and Cybèle becomes a stirring contemplation of an alliance between two troubled souls.”

Order on Amazon / Barnes & Noble / Deep Discount / Best Buy
Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Ali: Fear Eats The Soul

“The wildly prolific German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder paid homage to his cinematic hero Douglas Sirk with this update of that filmmaker’s 1955 All That Heaven Allows. A lonely widow (Brigitte Mira) meets a much younger Arab worker (El Hedi ben Salem) in a bar during a rainstorm. They fall in love, to their own surprise—and to the outright shock of their families, colleagues, and drinking buddies. In Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, Fassbinder expertly wields the emotional power of classic Hollywood melodrama to expose the racial tensions underlying contemporary German culture.”

Order on Amazon / Barnes & Noble / Deep Discount / Best Buy

criterioncast:

Available on Blu-ray today from the Criterion Collection:

Serge Bourguignon’s Sundays and Cybèle

“In this provocative Academy Award winner from French director Serge Bourguignon, a psychologically damaged war veteran and a neglected child begin a startlingly intimate friendship—one that ultimately ignites the suspicion and anger of his friends and neighbors in suburban Paris. Bourguignon’s film makes thoughtful, humane drama out of potentially incendiary subject matter, and with the help of the sensitive cinematography of Henri Decaë and a delicate score by Maurice Jarre, Sundays and Cybèle becomes a stirring contemplation of an alliance between two troubled souls.”

Order on Amazon / Barnes & Noble / Deep Discount / Best Buy

Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Ali: Fear Eats The Soul

“The wildly prolific German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder paid homage to his cinematic hero Douglas Sirk with this update of that filmmaker’s 1955 All That Heaven Allows. A lonely widow (Brigitte Mira) meets a much younger Arab worker (El Hedi ben Salem) in a bar during a rainstorm. They fall in love, to their own surprise—and to the outright shock of their families, colleagues, and drinking buddies. In Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, Fassbinder expertly wields the emotional power of classic Hollywood melodrama to expose the racial tensions underlying contemporary German culture.”

Order on Amazon / Barnes & Noble / Deep Discount / Best Buy


The Grifters, 1990. Director: Stephen Frears.
The Grifters, 1990. Director: Stephen Frears.