criterioncast:


The October 2014 Criterion Collection titles are now available to pre-order on Amazon:
October 14th
My Darling Clementine
October 21st
La Dolce Vita
F For Fake Blu-ray
October 28th
The Complete Jacques Tati
The Vanishing Blu-ray
criterioncast:


The October 2014 Criterion Collection titles are now available to pre-order on Amazon:
October 14th
My Darling Clementine
October 21st
La Dolce Vita
F For Fake Blu-ray
October 28th
The Complete Jacques Tati
The Vanishing Blu-ray
criterioncast:


The October 2014 Criterion Collection titles are now available to pre-order on Amazon:
October 14th
My Darling Clementine
October 21st
La Dolce Vita
F For Fake Blu-ray
October 28th
The Complete Jacques Tati
The Vanishing Blu-ray
criterioncast:


The October 2014 Criterion Collection titles are now available to pre-order on Amazon:
October 14th
My Darling Clementine
October 21st
La Dolce Vita
F For Fake Blu-ray
October 28th
The Complete Jacques Tati
The Vanishing Blu-ray
criterioncast:


The October 2014 Criterion Collection titles are now available to pre-order on Amazon:
October 14th
My Darling Clementine
October 21st
La Dolce Vita
F For Fake Blu-ray
October 28th
The Complete Jacques Tati
The Vanishing Blu-ray

criterioncast:

The October 2014 Criterion Collection titles are now available to pre-order on Amazon:

October 14th

October 21st

October 28th

cinephiliabeyond:

On the set of his early short film, From the Drain  (1967), director David Cronenberg films Stefan Nosko, with the assistance of Sound Recordist Margaret Hindson, courtesy of David Cronenberg: Virtual Exhibition.

You’d expect a bit of strangeness from David Cronenberg‘s student films, but for most of its short length, From the Drain, which he made in 1967 while attending the University of Toronto, seems to deliver strangeness of an unexpected kind. Playing more like Waiting for Godot than his later vivid-to-the point of harrowing pictures like Crash, Videodrome, or The Fly, this thirteen-minute black-and-white film, only Cronenberg’s second, presents us with two fellows seated, fully clothed, in a bathtub. The situation looks bizarre, and as soon as the players start talking, it reveals itself as even more bizarre than we’d thought: evidently, one of these men has mistaken the tub for “the Disabled War Veterans’ Recreation Center.” The conversation continues without its participants leaving their porcelain confines, making a certain kind of sense on the surface but none at all beneath. This feels almost like the realm of Monty Python’s Flying Circus, which wouldn’t debut and begin exerting its vast influence on young comedic filmmakers until 1969. —From the Drain: a creepy comedy David Cronenberg made in film school

If you are a fan of David Cronenberg, then I would absolutely recommend checking Long Live the New Flesh: The Films of David Cronenberg  (1986), Videodrome: Forging the New Flesh  (2004), and David Cronenberg and the Cinema of the Extreme  (BBC, 1997).

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood —international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood —international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood —international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood —international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood —international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood —international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood —international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood —international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood —international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood —international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

the-chernaya-vdova:

boyhood international trailer [x]

Richard Linklater’s BOYHOOD — a fictional drama made with the same group of actors over a 12-year period from 2002-2013 — takes a one-of-a-kind trip, at once epic and intimate, through the exhilaration of childhood, the seismic shifts of a modern family and the very passage of time.

(via oldfilmsflicker)

brightwalldarkroom:

David Foster Wallace, on seeing Blue Velvet for the first time:

"The screen gets all fuzzy now as the viewer’s invited to imagine this. Coming out of an avant garde tradition, I get to this grad school and at the grad school, turns out all the teachers are realists. They’re not at all interested in post-modern avant garde stuff. Now, there’s an interesting delusion going on here — so they don’t like my stuff. I believe that it’s not because my stuff isn’t good, but because they just don’t happen to like this kind of esthetic.

In fact, known to them but unknown to me, the stuff was bad, was indeed bad. So in the middle of all this, hating the teachers, but hating them for exactly the wrong reason — this was spring of 1986 — I remember — I remember who I went to see the movie with — “Blue Velvet” comes out. “Blue Velvet” comes out.

“Blue Velvet” is a type of surrealism — it may have some — it may have debts. There’s a debt to Hitchcock somewhere. But it is an entirely new and original kind of surrealism. It no more comes out of a previous tradition or the post-modern thing. It is completely David Lynch. And I don’t know how well you or your viewers would remember the film, but there are some very odd — there’s a moment when a guy named “the yellow man” is shot in an apartment and then Jeffrey, the main character, runs into the apartment and the guy’s dead, but he’s still standing there. And there’s no explanation. You know, he’s just standing there. And it is — it’s almost classically French — Francophilistically surreal, and yet it seems absolutely true and absolutely appropriate.

And there was this — I know I’m taking a long time to answer your question. There was this way in which I all of a sudden realized that the point of being post-modern or being avant garde or whatever wasn’t to follow in a certain kind of tradition, that all that stuff is B.S. imposed by critics and camp followers afterwards, that what the really great artists do — and it sounds very trite to say it out loud, but what the really great artists do is they’re entirely themselves. They’re entirely themselves. They’ve got their own vision, their own way of fracturing reality, and that if it’s authentic and true, you will feel it in your nerve endings. And this is what “Blue Velvet” did for me.

I’m not suggesting it would do it for any other viewer, but I — Lynch very much helped snap me out of a kind of adolescent delusion that I was in about what sort of avant garde art could be. And it’s very odd because film and books are very different media. But I remember — I remember going with two poets and one other student fiction writer to go see this and then all of us going to the coffee shop afterwards and just, you know, slapping ourselves on the forehead. And it was this truly epiphantic experience.”

(via oldfilmsflicker)

cinephiliabeyond:

The good folks at Stanley and Us Project  have assembled a series of tales of Kubrick from a documentary by directors Mauro di Flaviano, Federico Greco, Stefano Landini on Stanley Kubrick. The shooting began in 1997, during the Venice Film Festival, when the Golden Lion for the career was given to Mr. Kubrick. The final result included interviews to more than 30 collaborators, friends and relatives, many shootings on the Kubrick’s film locations and a collection of documentation material, such as photos and screenplays. Most part of this material was organised in 37 episodes of 15 minutes each plus a 1 hour film for the Italian satellite channel Rai Sat.

In 1997 during the course of making the original Stanley and Us documentary, the trio recorded over seven-and-half hours’ worth of interviews, but only used a small percentage of this in the finished film. After Stanley and Us was released in 1999, they packaged the interviews in to 30-minute shows for Italian television’s RAI channel. Over the past two years as part of the on-going Stanley and Us Project interviews have been appearing on YouTube and include such gems as waspish critic, the late Alexander Walker explaining why Kubrick was in awe of Peter Sellers, and why Sellers was mad; daughter Katharina Kubrick talking about the “crazy time” after the release of A Clockwork Orange; designer Ken Adam on Kubrick verses Bond; the legendary actor Murray Melvin discussing 57 takes on Barry Lyndon; editor Gordon Stainforth on why Kubrick was always right; Darth Vader actor David Prowse on “one-take Kubrick”; actor Michael Tarn on why the script was the book; executive producer Jan Harlan on Kubrick’s use of time; and Kubrick’s wife Christiane on Stanley’s acceptance speech video for Directors Guild of America D.W. Griffith Award and why he didn’t do interviews; and Walker again, this time on Kubrick’s funeral. Playlist below begins with biographer John Baxter on Kubrick’s “private movies for a public audience.” —Dangerous Minds 


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// 
cinephiliabeyond:

The good folks at Stanley and Us Project  have assembled a series of tales of Kubrick from a documentary by directors Mauro di Flaviano, Federico Greco, Stefano Landini on Stanley Kubrick. The shooting began in 1997, during the Venice Film Festival, when the Golden Lion for the career was given to Mr. Kubrick. The final result included interviews to more than 30 collaborators, friends and relatives, many shootings on the Kubrick’s film locations and a collection of documentation material, such as photos and screenplays. Most part of this material was organised in 37 episodes of 15 minutes each plus a 1 hour film for the Italian satellite channel Rai Sat.

In 1997 during the course of making the original Stanley and Us documentary, the trio recorded over seven-and-half hours’ worth of interviews, but only used a small percentage of this in the finished film. After Stanley and Us was released in 1999, they packaged the interviews in to 30-minute shows for Italian television’s RAI channel. Over the past two years as part of the on-going Stanley and Us Project interviews have been appearing on YouTube and include such gems as waspish critic, the late Alexander Walker explaining why Kubrick was in awe of Peter Sellers, and why Sellers was mad; daughter Katharina Kubrick talking about the “crazy time” after the release of A Clockwork Orange; designer Ken Adam on Kubrick verses Bond; the legendary actor Murray Melvin discussing 57 takes on Barry Lyndon; editor Gordon Stainforth on why Kubrick was always right; Darth Vader actor David Prowse on “one-take Kubrick”; actor Michael Tarn on why the script was the book; executive producer Jan Harlan on Kubrick’s use of time; and Kubrick’s wife Christiane on Stanley’s acceptance speech video for Directors Guild of America D.W. Griffith Award and why he didn’t do interviews; and Walker again, this time on Kubrick’s funeral. Playlist below begins with biographer John Baxter on Kubrick’s “private movies for a public audience.” —Dangerous Minds 


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// 
cinephiliabeyond:

The good folks at Stanley and Us Project  have assembled a series of tales of Kubrick from a documentary by directors Mauro di Flaviano, Federico Greco, Stefano Landini on Stanley Kubrick. The shooting began in 1997, during the Venice Film Festival, when the Golden Lion for the career was given to Mr. Kubrick. The final result included interviews to more than 30 collaborators, friends and relatives, many shootings on the Kubrick’s film locations and a collection of documentation material, such as photos and screenplays. Most part of this material was organised in 37 episodes of 15 minutes each plus a 1 hour film for the Italian satellite channel Rai Sat.

In 1997 during the course of making the original Stanley and Us documentary, the trio recorded over seven-and-half hours’ worth of interviews, but only used a small percentage of this in the finished film. After Stanley and Us was released in 1999, they packaged the interviews in to 30-minute shows for Italian television’s RAI channel. Over the past two years as part of the on-going Stanley and Us Project interviews have been appearing on YouTube and include such gems as waspish critic, the late Alexander Walker explaining why Kubrick was in awe of Peter Sellers, and why Sellers was mad; daughter Katharina Kubrick talking about the “crazy time” after the release of A Clockwork Orange; designer Ken Adam on Kubrick verses Bond; the legendary actor Murray Melvin discussing 57 takes on Barry Lyndon; editor Gordon Stainforth on why Kubrick was always right; Darth Vader actor David Prowse on “one-take Kubrick”; actor Michael Tarn on why the script was the book; executive producer Jan Harlan on Kubrick’s use of time; and Kubrick’s wife Christiane on Stanley’s acceptance speech video for Directors Guild of America D.W. Griffith Award and why he didn’t do interviews; and Walker again, this time on Kubrick’s funeral. Playlist below begins with biographer John Baxter on Kubrick’s “private movies for a public audience.” —Dangerous Minds 


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephiliabeyond:

The good folks at Stanley and Us Project  have assembled a series of tales of Kubrick from a documentary by directors Mauro di Flaviano, Federico Greco, Stefano Landini on Stanley Kubrick. The shooting began in 1997, during the Venice Film Festival, when the Golden Lion for the career was given to Mr. Kubrick. The final result included interviews to more than 30 collaborators, friends and relatives, many shootings on the Kubrick’s film locations and a collection of documentation material, such as photos and screenplays. Most part of this material was organised in 37 episodes of 15 minutes each plus a 1 hour film for the Italian satellite channel Rai Sat.

In 1997 during the course of making the original Stanley and Us documentary, the trio recorded over seven-and-half hours’ worth of interviews, but only used a small percentage of this in the finished film. After Stanley and Us was released in 1999, they packaged the interviews in to 30-minute shows for Italian television’s RAI channel. Over the past two years as part of the on-going Stanley and Us Project interviews have been appearing on YouTube and include such gems as waspish critic, the late Alexander Walker explaining why Kubrick was in awe of Peter Sellers, and why Sellers was mad; daughter Katharina Kubrick talking about the “crazy time” after the release of A Clockwork Orange; designer Ken Adam on Kubrick verses Bond; the legendary actor Murray Melvin discussing 57 takes on Barry Lyndon; editor Gordon Stainforth on why Kubrick was always right; Darth Vader actor David Prowse on “one-take Kubrick”; actor Michael Tarn on why the script was the book; executive producer Jan Harlan on Kubrick’s use of time; and Kubrick’s wife Christiane on Stanley’s acceptance speech video for Directors Guild of America D.W. Griffith Award and why he didn’t do interviews; and Walker again, this time on Kubrick’s funeral. Playlist below begins with biographer John Baxter on Kubrick’s “private movies for a public audience.” —Dangerous Minds

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going: